Archives

Cooking Ideas

Not sure of what to cook at your next outdoor cooking session or during Group Camp? Get some ideas from the Scouting Magazine here!

15 Essential Scouting Skills

Happened to read some useful “essential” scouting skills in the Scouting Magazine Online. I thought some of them are quite true and worth highlighting so here it is.

9. Know the safe way to go night hiking

It’s easy to lose sight of each other, so it’s vital that the group stays together and goes at the pace of the slowest member. Listen out for hazards and make regular voice contact with each other. Use the pavement if there is one or walk on the right-hand side of the road. Approach right-hand bends with caution and walk no more than two abreast single file when there is an oncoming vehicle. Let the driver know you are there; your group should have two torches one at the front and one at the back but be careful not to aim the beam directly at the driver. Finally, wear light reflective clothing; ideally a jacket for the people at the front and back, with a reflective arm-band for each member of the party.

Click here for the link to the full article OR the PDF archive that I have saved.

Note: The article is written under UK context, so some points might not be relevant in Singapore. Also, I have saved a PDF archive as I don’t trust links that are using IP address (87.127.227.195 in this case) as you never know when the link will be broken.

Camping Fire

Types of fires and how to light them and use them

Always have problem starting your fire for outdoor cooking? Take a look at this article on camping fire and understand the logic behind lighting and using them. Read this before you light your next fire and you will understand better!

Tinder

Tinder is any kind of material that will take very little effort to light. Good tinder will only need a spark to ignite it. Some examples are;

  • Birch bark, dried grasses, fine wood shavings, cotton fluff, bird down and waxed paper
  • Pine needles, pulverized fir cones and the inner bark from cedar trees
  • Dried fungi (apparently!), scorched or charred linen/cotton
  • Dry nests of mice and birds are rather good (CARE must be taken. They must be abandoned and free of life!)

There is just one major thing to remember – Your tinder must be dry

Kindling

I would class kindling as the next step up from tinder. It is the wood that you use to raise the fire from the (short burning) tinder so that eventually you can use larger pieces of fuel. The best kindling is small, dry twigs (soft woods are preferable as they flare up quickly).

Those woods that contain resins burn readily and make firelighting easier. The only problem with soft woods is that they burn fast! Make sure you have a plentiful supply to hand, arranged in different ‘grades’ according to size.

I would suggest that the smallest kindling grade be thinner than a matchstick for certain, working up to the thickness of two or so matches. The thinner and smaller the better. I’ll say it again, as it is important, go and get some more kindling now before you even think about starting the fire. There is nothing worse than starting a small flame and lacking the fuel to keep it going.

Click here for the full article at Scouting Resources

P.S. It has been rare quiet for a while here. Don’t worry, the site is still being updated. Have been trying to find good contents to post but it is hard to find. Also, I am currently working at a new company so it is back to the old long working hours for me. Found a good site with good articles. Will be writing to them soon asking for their permission to include their content here. Stay tune!

Edit: Permission has been granted to include excerpts of articles from Scouting Resources!