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Map And Compass

Map And Compass Cover

Having your exploration test soon? This ebook would be a good read before taking that “hard-to-pass” test, to refresh your basics.

eBook: Map And Compass [ original copy | mirror copy | 540KB | Source: The Dump ]

Knotting For Scouts

Knotting For Scouts Cover

As a followup to my previous post on knots, here is an ebook on some knots commonly used by everyone. Enjoy!

eBook: Knotting For Scouts [ original copy | mirror copy | 1.18MB | Source: The Dump ]

First Aid

First Aid

First Aid is an important skill that every scout should know. It should be noted that first aid is not the definitive medical care/treatment, but the first assistance you can give to an injuried person. The following are some ebooks on first aid that should help brush up your knowledge. It is important to attend a first aid course if you wish to practice first aid, and not depend on these ebooks only.

eBook: Simple First Aid [ original copy | mirror copy | 32.3KB | Source: ScoutBase UK Factsheets ]

eBook: First Aid Guide [ download copy | 454KB | Source: Unknown ]

More external resources: BBC Health, First Aid Index, First Aid on your Mobile, First Aid Training Book

The Baden-Powell Story

Want to know more about our founder but reading books will put you to sleep? Why not read the story of BP in a comic-style book. See below for the link to the ebook!

The Baden-Powell Story Book Cover

eBook: The Baden-Powell Story [ original copy | mirror copy | 3.44MB | Source: The Dump ]

Scouting for Boys on BBC

Found a documentary on Scouting for Boys, featured on BBC via YouTube. Quite interesting to watch but it will take a while of your time. The video is broken down into 6 parts as shown below.

Enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N388CtFGCMU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xE_MG8-4PEg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8beXJ1zxcs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rhH6OVoaNjc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJcw7ky2A54

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93Qj9-EHXJk

Cooking Ideas

Not sure of what to cook at your next outdoor cooking session or during Group Camp? Get some ideas from the Scouting Magazine here!

Morse Code

While not frequently used in today’s world, I believe Morse code is a nice “old” skill to know for survival purpose or to be employed as an assistive technology. Please read about it below.

Excerpt from Wikipedia:

Morse code’ is a type of character encoding that transmits telegraphic information using rhythm. Morse code uses a standardized sequences of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a given message. The short and long elements can be formed by sounds, marks, or pulses, in on off keying and are commonly known as “dots” and “dashes” or “dits” and “dahs”. The speed of telecommunication transmission is often measured in baud. However, in the case of Morse code, it is measured as WPM speed.

Excerpt from Scouting Resources:

In Morse code, timing is important to ensure that a coherent message is received. The actual length of a dot can be as long as you like, but obviously it should be short enough that messages can be sent quickly and long enough to be heard over great distances. Once this standard unit of time has been established, a dash should last three times as long as a dot. The pause between individual dots and dashes should take as long as a single dot, the pause between two characters should take as long as a dash and the pause between two words should be twice as long as a dash (six times as long as a dot).

Click here for the full article at Wikipedia

Click here for the full article at Scouting Resources

Hour Glass Tower

Not sure how to go about building a hour glass tower for your pioneering project? Take this as a reference and modify according to your own design!

The Hour Glass

The tower is constructed from two large pyramids interlocked together. It must be built on its side then raised vertically with the aid of an additional tripod of spars. Care must be taken to ensure that all the equipment used is in excellent condition and that the lashings are really tight. We recommend that you make a model from garden canes first as this will help you to see where things are meant to go and how the tower fits together – everything looks very different when lying on its side!

Method

Using 3 x 3.6m spars and a figure of 8 lashing, build a tripod.

Using square lashings, fix 3 x 2.5m spars across the butt ends. (a) This is the base unit – lay it on its side.

Prepare a second tripod with 3 more 3.5m long spars.

Feed one leg of the tripod through the apex of the base unit. Complete the top unit by lashing 3 x 2.5m spars close to the butt ends – this will form the handrail.

(b) Once the frames have been positioned correctly, lash the main spars together using square lashings. Note: although the spars cross at an acute angle, you must use a square lashing.

Add additional strength by lashing the apex of each tripod to the opposite main spars using a round turn and two half hitches.

(c) Build a tripod using the remaining long spars and hang the pulley to its apex. Position this about 10m from the tower. Fix the long ropes to the apex of the base unit and feed the upper one through the pulley – the other two ropes are used to keep the tower steady as it is raised.

Once the tower is upright, check that the top is level. Lower it again and make any necessary adjustments.

While the tower is horizontal, fit the platform by lashing the 3 x 2m spars about 1m below the handrail and lashing the light spars across them.

Attach the rope ladder to the platform and the lower horizontal spar.

Attach guy ropes to the main spars above the hand rail.

Raise the tower.

Click here for the full article at Pioneering Made Easy

Safety Codes

These are some good to know stuff. Do note that not all content are relevant in Singapore.

There are a variety of safety codes issued by various bodies that would prove most useful to all members of the Scouting Movement.

  • Countryside Code
  • Firework Code
  • Railway Safety
  • Passenger Safety
  • Cycling Safety
  • Pedestrian Safety

Click here for the full article at Scouting Resources

The A-Z of Knots

Knots are a fundamental part of scouting skills. This site has a huge library of various knots and how to tie them most mostly are not comprehensive enough in my opinion. See and decide for yourself!

An illustrated A-Z walkthrough of some of the most common (and not so common) knots. Each knot has a short description and (almost) every one has an illustration demonstrating the knot.

Blood Knot

A multiple Overhand Knot tied in the end of a heaving line. It derives its name from its use in a ropes end which was used as a weapon or for inflicting punishment, when it would often ‘draw blood’. This knot was used by the Incas of Peru in ‘Quipus’ or knot records.

Sheepshank

A knot tied in the bight for shortening a rope or taking up the slack, without cutting it. It can also be used to protect a weak, damaged or frayed section of the rope. See also Tom Fool Knot.

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation license, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation

Click here for the full article at Scouting Resources

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